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“But I Want Them To Have A Happy Healthy Relationship With Their Other Parent”


When a parent who is engaging in alienating behaviors claims they want their children to have a happy loving relationship with their other parent, it may not always align with their actions. In many cases of parental alienation, the words spoken by the alienating parent do not reflect their true intentions or behaviors. Here are some possible interpretations of what an alienating parent might mean when they say they want their children to have a happy and loving relationship with the other parent.


The alienating parent may use this statement as a way to appear cooperative and caring in front of others, such as family members, friends, or legal professionals. By saying they want the children to have a good relationship with the other parent, they may seek to manipulate perceptions and gain favor in the custody dispute.


The alienating parent may employ gaslighting tactics by projecting a false image of concern for the children's well-being and relationship with the other parent. This can confuse the children and make them doubt their own experiences and feelings about the situation.


By stating that they want the children to have a positive relationship with the other parent, the alienating parent may attempt to justify their alienating behaviors and shift blame onto the other parent. They may use this claim to deflect attention from their own harmful actions and portray themselves as the reasonable and caring parent.

In some rare cases, the alienating parent may genuinely believe that they are acting in the best interests of the children by alienating them from the other parent. Despite their harmful behaviors, they may convince themselves that they are protecting the children from perceived harm or negative influences.


The alienating parent's statement about wanting the children to have a happy and loving relationship with the other parent could be more about maintaining their own self-image as a loving and responsible parent rather than a genuine desire for the children's well-being. They may prioritize their own ego and reputation over the children's needs.


When an alienating parent claims to want the children to have a happy and loving relationship with the other parent, it is essential to scrutinize their actions and behaviors to determine the sincerity and authenticity of their intentions. Often, the actions speak louder than words in cases of parental alienation.

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